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Adjust Your Bar Height | Mission Control



Need to shift your weight forward or backwards on your bike? Set your bar height accordingly…

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Your handle bars provide the contact point which sets your body position on the bike. Depending on what type of riding you spend your time doing you may want your handle bars higher or lower. In this video we explain how your bars effect your body position and which body position is best for which type of riding.

Watch more on GMBN…
▶︎Where To Pop A Wheelie
▶︎Stem Length Explained
▶︎What MTB Should You Buy?

Music: Dr Strafe – Bogota Bullion

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source: https://tim2lead.com

Xem thêm các bài viết về Giải Trí: https://tim2lead.com/category/giai-tri/

25 thoughts on “Adjust Your Bar Height | Mission Control

  1. THIS and the previous video featured guys going "blah blah blah", without saying how to RAISE THE HEIGHT OF MY HANDLEBARS.

  2. Main area I struggle on descents is back pain , finding that sweet spot for my bars on descents is not always the same for general pedaling around

  3. Hi GMBN, how about a video showing wheelie/manual-ability vs bar width! Start with wide bars and chop down in increments…

  4. Sorry to bother yogu. Are I have 2014 zesty 329 is a trial 29er bike with 120mm travel I want to feel more secure as I go DH. Will a riser bar help me stay more secure behind the bars and how many mm do you recommend

  5. Not a single wrench is turned in this video to demonstrate raising bar. Complete waist of time to watch, with lots of Grey Poupon chitter chattering from two power ranger dressed white dudes.

  6. I enjoy casual trail riding, but do enjoy sending some down hill. I have 4 spacers (idk what height), should I remove them?

  7. XC – more weight to the front wheel? Seriously?? Could you give me any source that explains it? I've been riding cross country a lot and on flat terrain there's much more weight on the rear. I would say: XC – 40 front/ 60 rear, enduro – 35 front / 55 rear, DH – 30 front / 70 rear and I think I actually heard it somewhere. Confirms with my observations as I do a little enduro.

  8. Hello guys. need some advice. I recently installed a stem riser onto my mountain bike, and it doesn't seem to be stable. Let me explain: before every bike ride, I like to test that everything is in tact to prevent any injuries, you know, things like the seat, handlebars, and peddles. I've tested the handlebar too by trying to move it side to side, and after installing the stem riser, THE HANDLEBARS MOVE.

    I need to know whether this is normal? Should I return it?

    PLEASE NOTE: Its not super lose, so requires a little bit of strength to get handlebars to move out of position. BEFORE installing the stem riser, this did not happen….EVER!

    what should i do? Thanks

  9. will 10mm rise in bar height make a difference? kinda feel stretched and sketchy in my local dh/enduro track. but how do i determine if its because poor posture or bar height?

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