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12 Bar Blues In 12 Keys – Blues Rhythm Guitar Lessons [BL-201]



This is the first lesson in a series of lesson looking at Blues Rhythm Guitar, an Intermediate Module. This lesson looks at a simple visual trick to get you playing a 12 Bar Blues in every and any key. It’s quite simple, but something I struggled with when I first started playing Blues rhythm which is why I’m starting the course with this – it’s absolutely essential that you understand this… I know I rambled a bit and repeated stuff, but it’s so important that I wanted to ensure it goes in 🙂

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Find the related course notes on the following link:

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38 thoughts on “12 Bar Blues In 12 Keys – Blues Rhythm Guitar Lessons [BL-201]

  1. you do the turnaround a bit different than I learned it.. you go right to the 5 chord and turnaround, I go to the 4 then slide up to the 5 n turnaround, guess I do it JB good style like Chuck or maybe Preist? I think… lol

    I get that teaching it in its most basic form is best to start.. then embellish once you learn the patterns and and such and progress

    also I had never dropped back to the 4 chord before, I've thought about it but never chased it down to see how it sounded, it really works, nice change too, one could do a few versus like that then maybe a verse going up to the 4.. cool stuff

  2. If playing C5 starting on the 8th and going up to A on ttwelfth with your pinky what chord does that become? We can't call it a C5 ..

  3. Hi justin, is there another way of playing the 12 bar shuffle with out the little finger. I have limited use of it. Thank you

  4. The F thing is awful when one plays standing. I'm gonna start applying the position on the 5th string.

  5. 10:30
    Man you're telling me THAT stretch is a struggle? Tell me how I'm supposed to deal with the first fret to sixth fret stretch on this track.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEQ-q4kEJ2k

  6. I love the lesson. There is one thing I don't understand though. When Justin is showing the CFG pattern starting on the A string he says that we have to move down the neck to the first fret of the low E-string and then to the third fret of the low E-string. Why cant we simply use the L-shaped pattern going from the third fret of the A-string, to the third fret of the D-string and to the fifth fret of the D-string? Justin seems also to imply that playing the CFG pattern on the A and E string is equivalent to playing the same pattern further up the neck starting on the E string and doing the L-shape. Is it though? I mean, when you do the L-shape starting on the E-string you are playing withing the same octave. When you do the pattern starting on the A-string you play on different octaves. Is this unimportant?

  7. I have a quick question Justin. Playing a 12 bar blues using a 1-4-5 in the key of C would be the chord progression C-F-G. The relative minor to C is Am, so if I'm playing with my #1 chord being an Am, would my 1-4-5 be Am-Dm-Em?

  8. this is so much more difficult than I anticipated – my hands hurts after 3 minutes! I guess it takes a while after the hand is getting relaxed enough… this and bends are the bitches of blues 🙂

  9. Very helpful advice – I’ve learnt more from this one video since starting to dabble with the guitar more than 40 years ago!

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